• Provides five years of funding to enable talented clinicians to pursue academic research alongside their clinical practice.
  • Looks for outstanding professionals who are committed to improving practice through advances in clinical research, and are driven to inspire others.
  • Enables coherent training and career pathways for clinicians seeking to carry out academic research into topics that are of direct benefit to patients
  • The Health Foundation works with the Academy of Medical Sciences to run the fellowship. 

The Clinician Scientist Fellowship includes:

  • five years’ funding to cover personal salary
  • an allowance for research expenses
  • a leadership development programme
  • mentoring from an Academy of Medical Sciences fellow
  • extensive opportunities to network with experts and peers

Through the programme, fellows have the opportunity to build the foundations for a career in clinical academic medicine while conducting valuable research that will improve the quality of care for patients.

The programme focuses on research within disciplines where there is a national shortage of expertise, including anaesthesia, paediatric disciplines, pathology, psychiatry, radiology and surgery.

The Clinician Scientist Fellows comprise a core group of research-led clinical academics who are able to cultivate and lead key research programmes and teams. From 2013, new fellows will also be exploring the links between their discipline and improvement science, offering a unique opportunity to maximise learning in order to improve quality in health care.

Benefits

An evaluation of the Clinician Scientist Fellowships identified the following benefits:

  • Helped participants to attract further investment in clinical academic medicine from other organisations. Thirteen fellows had received more than £4.2m in additional research funding.
  • Gave fellows the opportunity to become leaders in their field. Several fellows have received prestigious awards. Others have been featured on documentaries about their research. Some have gone on to establish research centres or been awarded professorships.
  • There are indications that the academic centres where the research is being carried out are increasingly being recognised as centres of excellence for clinical academic training.