• Senior Research Fellow at the Health Services Research Unit of the University of Aberdeen
  • A health services researcher with a background as a clinical pharmacist
  • Fellowship project will involve patient and public involvement in developing quality standards, indicators and measures for community pharmacy practice
  • 2014 Improvement Science fellow

Margaret Watson is a health services researcher and pharmacist. She trained as a clinical pharmacist and worked from 1986 to 1994 as a pharmacist in Dundee, Glasgow and Bristol. She then moved into the research arena, undertaking her PhD within the Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bristol.

In 1999 she moved to the University of Aberdeen, where she was Research Fellow at the Centre of Academic Primary Care, and also undertook Medical Research Council Special Training Fellowships in Health Services Research. She is currently Senior Research Fellow at the Health Services Research Unit at the University of Aberdeen.

Through the Improvement Science fellowship, Margaret is interested in developing her skills in identifying and engaging with key stakeholders in order to increase the likelihood of sustained, improved quality of pharmacy practice: ‘The fellowship will enable me to maximise the contribution that community pharmacy can make to health care service delivery and patient benefit, including greater patient empowerment to engage in the self-management of their health, with anticipated improved health outcomes and greater quality of life.’

Margaret's project

The project Margaret will be working on during the fellowship is around patient and public involvement in the development of quality standards, indicators and measures for community pharmacy practice:

‘Many patients prefer to self-care to manage minor illness and there is a need to support this preference. The current management of acute consultations in pharmacy is sub-optimal and quality improvement initiatives are needed to improve the safe, effective, person-centred management of these consultations.’