• Run by the PROMPT (PRactical Obstetric Multi-Professional Training) Maternity Foundation. 
  • Developing regional ‘hubs’ across the UK to provide initial and ongoing support to other local maternity units. 
  • PROMPT training is associated with direct improvements in perinatal outcomes and improved knowledge, clinical skills and team working.
  • Aiming to develop a social franchise model to support, sustain and quality-assure the roll-out of local PROMPT multi-professional training.

The PRactical Obstetric Multi-Professional Training (PROMPT) programme was first introduced at North Bristol NHS Trust in 2000 to improve the quality and safety of care provided to mothers and babies. It has been associated with reduced neonatal hypoxic injuries (caused by lack of oxygen during labour and birth), and permanent brachial plexus (nerve) injuries following difficulties with the birth of the babies’ shoulders (shoulder dystocia). There is also evidence that PROMPT training improves multi-professional teamworking during maternity emergencies. 

The training package was developed by a team of clinicians from the PROMPT Maternity Foundation (PMF) charity. The PMF trainers are midwives, obstetricians and anaesthetists. Using a ‘train the trainers’ (T3) model, they provide evidence-based training materials and tools that can be used and adapted by local maternity units to enable them to deliver their own in-house PROMPT courses.

More than 75% of maternity units in the UK have attended a PROMPT T3 programme and taken away the PROMPT package, but not all units have successfully implemented and sustained PROMPT training locally. The South West-based PMF team would like to improve the support that is provided to UK teams. This project will investigate the development of a licensed social franchising model to establish regional, expert ‘hubs’ of PMF facilitators, who can help to support and sustain effective local training.

Maternity teams/units that have successfully introduced and sustained local PROMPT training will be selected to develop as ‘hubs’ that provide initial and ongoing support to other maternity units in their region, to ensure that authentic and quality-assured training is successfully implemented and maintained.

It is hoped that this intervention will encourage regional collaborative working with local commissioners and policymakers, ensuring that the same quality of care and birth outcomes are available nationwide. 

As well as improving care and reducing complications in labour and birth, effective implementation of PROMPT has the potential to offer financial benefits by reducing costs associated with litigation, staff stress and sickness absence.