• £1.6 million is available for research that advances the development and use of data from national clinical audits and patient registries as a mechanism for improving health care quality in the UK.
  • The programme comprises two funding streams for small and large-scale awards.
  • Applications closed on Tuesday 25 July 2017.

The Health Foundation is exploring what a learning health care system might look like in the UK and wants to better understand the elements that could contribute to making one. We recognise that digitisation and analysis of data and information play an important role in supporting health care systems to continuously learn and improve.

The rich information held in national clinical audits and registries can be used to inform improvements in health care quality. However, national audits and registries are yet to realise their full potential in the UK.

The Health Foundation’s £1.6 million Insight 2017 funding invites researchers to submit ideas for research that advances the development and use of data from national clinical audits and patient registries as a mechanism for improving health care quality in the UK.

The programme comprises two funding streams:

  • Small-scale awards – up to £100,000 to support innovative research that is particularly novel or conducted at a small scale, completed over 18 months. Projects eligible for funding under this stream include standalone research studies, and feasibility or pilot studies.
  • Large-scale awards – between £300,000 and £400,000 for substantive studies across more than one site and/or location of innovative and ambitious research with the potential to support transformational change, completed over three years.

The call aims to fund research that either:

  • broadens the involvement of patients in the design and collection of clinical audit and registry data, specifically the collection and use of patient reported outcomes
  • demonstrates the value of linking clinical audit and registry data to other data, to improve the value of health care
  • explores variation in metrics of clinical quality and outlier identification to determine priorities for improvement.

Comments

Rosemary Jones



About a third of people in acute psychiatric wards have a history of head injury. The absurd disconnect in this country between neurology and psychiatry (not in Germany) means these people are diagnosed as schizophrenic, and as if anyone knows what that means apart from the literal translation - broken minded). At least one psychiatric trust will go to great lengths to prevent these people having what is essential to their long levity, including learning disability tests, support for their neck fractures and sufficient company. The neurology patients die early and their deaths are listed as evidence of psychiatric patients dying 10-20 years before they should.

And all this nonsense being despite scans and x-rays and despite recognition of similar conditions such as vascular dementia due to reduced blood flow to the brain.

Well, the typical head impact injury also involves reduced blood flow to the brain but though psychiatrists now recognize the condition in the old, their intelligence is so conditioned it cannot even extrapolate.

The consequences - dreadful suffering until an early death.

But would I be paid to research this ? Not likely.



Add new comment

* indicates a required field

Your email address will not be published on the site and will only be used if we need to contact you about your comment.

View our comments policy